Check out what's happening at the Indigenous Literacy Foundation. 

Make your bookstore an ILF Member in the year of Indigenous languages

Make your bookstore an ILF Member in the year of Indigenous languages

UNESCO has proclaimed 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. This year also marks our ninth birthday since Suzy Wilson of Riverbend Books established our Foundation. In this time, we have published books that represent up to 18 Aboriginal languages. From Walmajarri in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, to Arabana in South Australia, to Kriol in the Katherine region of the Northern Territory.  It’s the perfect time to support us and celebrate First Nations languages in your store. Sign up your bookshop as an ILF Member and we’ll provide you with a heap of fabulous in store visual...

  • Posted 20 June, 2019


Understanding what 'remote' means

Understanding what 'remote' means

Every morning at Stanwell Park Preschool in the Illawarra region south of Sydney there’s a yarning circle. This dedicated group time for the three- to five-year-olds always begins with a song of welcome and an acknowledgement of Dharawal country. In the run-up to Indigenous Literacy Day, the staff used the yarning circle to talk to the children about books, reading and living in remote communities. Stanwell Park might be a long way from some of the preschools that receive book packs from our Foundation, but these youngsters have now learnt what “remote” means. “It’s great being able to point to...

  • Posted 04 June, 2019


'Wamparla' is our Word of the Month - Celebrating Arabana in the UNESCO International Year of Indigenous Languages

'Wamparla' is our Word of the Month - Celebrating Arabana in the UNESCO International Year of Indigenous Languages

Wamparla is an Arabana word meaning possum. Arabana is an Indigenous language with three dialects. Some Arabana speakers live in rural parts of South Australia, around the west side of Lake Eyre to Stuart Range, and in places like Oodnadatta, Coward Springs, Neales River, Lake Cadibarrawirracanna and the Peake. These days, however, many Arabana people live off-country in urban centres as widespread as Adelaide, Port Augusta, Coober Pedy, Alice Springs and Darwin. Until recently, Arabana had been in steep decline. In 2004, there were about 250 Arabana speakers. By 2006 only 21 people spoke this language. In recent years, however,...

  • Posted 04 June, 2019


Bi-lingual books by and for kids from the Torres Strait

Bi-lingual books by and for kids from the Torres Strait

Tina Raye and Leonie Short from our team have just returned from a groundbreaking field trip to remote Boigu, Saibai and Dauan islands, which are so far north in the Torres Strait, you can see Papua New Guinea from them! With the aim of creating books in kakaw kawaw ya aka KKY) for children in the islands, and supporting the traditional languages strategy developed by Islanders, Tina and Leonie joined up with ILF Board member Leitha Assan and Ella Kris from the Torres Strait Island Regional Council to set up a series of story-writing workshops. “Leitha’s involvement was critical, “...

  • Posted 30 May, 2019


ILF is Reconciliation In Action

ILF is Reconciliation In Action

A message from our Program Director, this National Reconcilation Week... 27 May 2019. My name is Tina Raye and I’m the Program Director at ILF. I belong to the Arabana people, from near Kati Thanda Lake Eyre), and the Bardi and Jabirr Jabirr people, from north of Broome on the Dampier Peninsula. Yesterday, we acknowledged National Sorry Day to recognise members of the Stolen Generations. This National Day of Healing is at the heart of our steps towards reconciliation. Today marks the beginning of National Reconciliation Week and we reflect on this year's theme: GROUNDED IN TRUTH: Walk together with courage. Here, we are invited to learn a...

  • Posted 27 May, 2019